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Thursday, December 11, 2008
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Bravo! A thoughtful and insightful review of sane policy deliberation. Thanks.

Ira Blatt

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Just curious -- where do genetics play in the overall scheme?  I look at four co-workers: Three are thin and work out, one is heavier set.  The three that work out and are thin have dangerous cholesterol levels and higher blood pressure than the one heavier-set co-worker.  Who's the risk?

[name withheld by request]

Chevron

Peter responds:

That's one of those really big and important questions.  Looks like scientists are going back-and-forth on how genes and the environment interact.  Personally, I'd rather have good genes than a healthy lifestyle if I had to choose.

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Finally, somebody has come to their senses, in this case Professor Cappelli. The notion that healthy employees means lower healthcare costs appears to be one of those "duh" moments, except for the unfortunate reality that there is not a shred of scientific evidence to support that proposition.

Joe Rousseau, SPHR

Human Resources Director

Pines of Sarasota

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