SUBSCRIBE E-NEWSLETTERS AWARDS COLUMNS MULTIMEDIA CONFERENCES ABOUT US RESEARCH
Reader Feedback

Tuesday, August 26, 2008
Write To The Editor Reprints

I wanted to say that I beg to differ on the article that was written on the high-school diploma regarding individuals and GEDs.

I think it was a stereotypical written article and not all individuals with GEDs lack social skills and ambitions to want to do more with themselves. I think it was a slap in the face to individuals who have hard times due to the community surroundings that put them into situations that they have to support a household and/or help in bringing in income; it's unfortunate that some circumstances result in individuals not able to finish their education.

However, it shows greater ambition when a individual does obtain their GED because it shows that they wanted to accomplish having that equivalency of a high school diploma.  

I think that research about situations such as these needs to stop going off of what they are reading and go to the heart of the communities to get their statistics, analyze it and then give their opinion.

As a sales director and entrepreneur, I find it insulting to read such articles I have done many workshops on continuing education and etc .. . People just don't sit in a room and take a test for a GED; in some states, it is required for an individual to take a 12-week class to be able to take the test.

I think that as people move up in ranks in positions they lose site of human nature and the true meaning of what people are all about, there becomes an insensitivity to them and they start to look down on people and that is what I saw reading that article.

Newsletter Sign-Up:

Benefits
HR Technology
Talent Management
HR Leadership
Inside HR Tech
HRENow
Special Offers

Email Address



Privacy Policy

Stephanie Tempo

Starfish People

Miquon, Wisc.

Peter responds:

I appreciate your view, but my column wasn't based on my opinions about GED degrees.  It was based on research findings showing that GED graduates don't do nearly as well in the job market as regular high-school grads and have more trouble in a range of life outcomes. 

This isn't to say that GED grads shouldn't be commended for going back to school. 

The point of the column was that we are not doing as well as we think as a society with our high-school graduation rates because the GEDs don't lead to the same outcomes as a high school degree.

Copyright 2014© LRP Publications